Health Benefits of Quinoa

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Quinoa is a Powerful Vegetable Seed!

Although referred to as a grain, it is actually a seed from a vegetable related to Swiss chard, spinach and beets. Quinoa is pronounced keen-wa not kwin-o-a.

Quinoa was considered sacred by the Incas; they called it the “mother seed.” The Inca civilization in South America grew it in the high altitude of the Andes.  It was their staple food for 5,000 years. The Spanish conquistadors almost wiped quinoa out by making it illegal for the Indians to grow.  They did not see how useful it is. Finally in the 1980s two Americans discovered this nutrient-rich food and began growing quinoa in Colorado.

8 Health Benefits of Quinoa:

1. High quality protein with the nine essential amino acids, the protein balance is similar to milk. At 16.2 to 20 percent protein, it has is more protein than rice (7.5 percent), millet (9.9 percent) or wheat (14 percent).

2. Great source of riboflavin. Riboflavin has been shown to help reduce the frequency of attacks in migraine sufferers by improving the energy metabolism within the brain and muscle cells.

3. Inca warriors had more stamina and quicker recovery time by eating these quinoa seeds, making it a truly ancient powerfood.

4. Antiseptic. The saponins from quinoa are used to promote healing of skin injuries in South America.

5. Not fattening! Only 172 calories per 1/4 cup dry (24 of the calories from protein and only 12 from sugars, the rest are complex carbohydrates, fiber and healthy fats).

6. Gluten-free. Since it is not related to wheat, or even a grain, it is gluten-free.

7. Alkaline-forming. Although it is not strongly alkaline-forming, it is comparable to wild rice, amaranth, and sprouted grains.

8. Smart Carb: It is a complex carbohydrate with a low glycemic index, so it won’t spike your blood sugar.

7 Tips for Eating or Cooking:

Always rinse quinoa. Place quinoa in a strainer, then run cold water over it until the entire soapy residue has been washed away. You can taste test a few seeds; if they still have a bitter taste, run more cold water over them. Extra removal can be made by rubbing the seeds while rinsing with water. There are three main varieties: light yellow, red, and black. Make quinoa porridge for breakfast, add it to your salad at lunch, substitute if for brown rice with your vegetables and make a yummy quinoa pudding. Use quinoa flour in your gluten-free baking. Even the leaves of the quinoa plant are edible; they taste similar to spinach, chard and beets. Sprout quinoa; simply soak the quinoa in water for 12 hours, then keep it moist in a jar. Quinoa can even be popped like popcorn and is very popular with Peruvian children.

Quinoa Nutrition:
Nutritional Value of Quinoa (100 grams)

372 calories
Proteins 11.49 grams
Fat  4.86 grams
Carbohydrates  71.2 grams
Calcium  66 milligrams
Iron   8.5 milligrams
Vitamin  1 gram
Vitamin C  1 gram
Thiamin  0.24 grams
Riboflavin 0.23 grams
Niacin 1.40 grams

Source: Bethzabe Iiguez de Barrios. Mil Delicias de la Quinua. Oruro, Bolivia: (Editora Quelco, 1977), p. 29.

Interesting facts:

More than 200,000 pounds are gown each year in the US Rocky Mountains. Quinoa is the whitest and the sweetest tasting when grown above 12,500 feet. When it is grown at lower elevations, it is more bittersweet in taste. Quinoa thrives at altitudes of 9,000 to 13,000 feet above sea level and survives on as little as two inches of rainfall.

Use and Safety:

Quinoa, though highly nutritious, is actually coated with the toxic chemical saponin; you must rinse the quinoa thoroughly. Saponins can be challenging to the immune system and stomach. Commercial processing methods remove much of the bitter soapy saponins coating quinoa seeds, but it is best to rinse again to remove any of the powdery saponins that may remain on the seeds. Like any good foods, we need variety so do not eat it every day. A few times a week is good enough.

Although quinoa is not a commonly allergenic food and does not contain lots of purines, it does contain oxalates. This puts quinoa on the caution list for an oxalate-restricted diet.

How to Store:
It is best to store quinoa in an airtight container. If stored in the refrigerator, it will keep for three to six months.

Source:

http://realfoodforlife.com

Health Benefits of Quinoa
Health Benefits of Quinoa

BeWellBuzz

Larry & Oksana Ostrovsky, founders of BeWellBuzz, are Life Upgrade Coaches committed to helping you navigate through the latest natural health and personal development information to a destination of optimal wellness. The goal of this site is to be a catalyst in creating and spreading the Buzz, dispelling dangerous myths, society norms and helping you elevate your spirit, do more, live better, and think deeper one day at a time.We’d like to thank you in advance for not only visiting and arming yourself with great information but also sharing it with family and friends. Check out and subscribe to our YouTube Channel and become a fan of our Facebook Page
Health Benefits of Quinoa
Health Benefits of Quinoa

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